Addiction Services Blog

AG's MOM - MY INTRODUCTION

By Aaron's Mom (NYC unspoken Poet)

I start my message to you with - I LOVE YOU.  When my son Aaron was alive, he always asked me, "Mom, why is that the first thing out of your mouth when I call?"  I said,"Aaron, Sometimes you don't call for weeks, even months, and I have to seize the moment. I don't know when I"m going to get that opportunity next to say to my only son, I LOVE YOU."

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Is Codeine An Opiate? Find out here!

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Q) Is Codeine An Opiate?

Is Codeine an opiate? Many people think Codeine is a common painkiller, whilst true as it is one of the more socially accepted painkillers, but like all opiates is heavily addictive. SCROLL TO ANSWER

 

 

 

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Can You Die From Heroin Withdrawal? We Have The Answer!

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Q) Can you die from Heroin Withdrawal?


Whilst very rare, it is possible that withdrawing from Heroin could have potentially harmful effects.


Can you die from Heroin Withdrawal?

 

 

 

Know someone who needs help?

 

 

 

If you or someone you know is addicted and is asking the question, 'can you die from a heroin withdrawal', please contact us for support & guidance immediately.

 

 

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A Breakdown of Drug Maintenance Therapy (Vivitrol, Suboxone, Methadone)

A Breakdown of Drug Maintenance Therapy (Vivitrol, Suboxone, Methadone)
Addiction is unique among the many diseases that exist. While most diseases are either physical or psychological, addiction is actually both, existing somewhere in between the two. Oftentimes, we focus on the physical effects of addiction such as the weakening of the immune system, the damage to specific bodily organs and systems, and an overall worsening of one’s health. However, there are many other effects that can result from the development of an addiction, especially those effects that are mental and emotional. In fact, virtually the entire personality changes when a person develops an addiction, resulting in behavioral changes and other such effects.Fortunately, there are resources available that can help individuals to regain their independence from alcohol and drugs. More often than not, people think about inpatient drug rehabs; these are the residential-style facilities where people live on-site during their recoveries. During the process, he or she remains within the facilities to participate in various treatments throughout every day from the staff of experienced professionals and physicians. These inpatient programs can last as little as thirty days and as long as several months. However, inpatient programs aren’t the way to overcome an addiction. In fact, an option that’s been unexpectedly successful has been drug maintenance therapy. But what is a drug maintenance program? What drugs are used in this type of program?What Exactly is Drug Maintenance Therapy?Most of the time, when people hear the words “maintenance” and “therapy”, they associate the treatment with methadone, which is surely the most common form of maintenance therapy. However, we’ll discuss methadone a little later; first, it’s important that we gain an understanding of maintenance therapy in general. While the majority of addiction treatment options include and require abstinence, maintenance therapy is a bit different in that the individual is actually switched to a controlled, monitored substance in lieu of the drug to which they’d been addicted. In fact, it’s also known as medication-assisted therapy for this very reason.It works like this: A person suffering from addiction — typically to some type of opioid like heroin or prescription painkillers — is brought into a program wherein they’re provided with daily doses of some type of medication. The medication used serves several key purposes. For one thing, many addicts are resistant to the recovery process due to the fear they have of withdrawals. However, drug maintenance therapy allows them to discontinue their use of illicit drugs without having to suffer through a period of withdrawals. This makes maintenance programs much more accessible as detoxification is typically considered the most intimidating stage of the recovery process. Individuals can remain on maintenance therapy for an extended period of time without having to worry about hunting down their next fix. Additionally, maintenance programs often require some level of addiction treatment participation, whether it’s attending twelve-step meetings, psychotherapy, or some other requirement. In other words, the individual is able to learn some important recovery skills while being able to skip over the detoxification part.As well, the medications that are used for maintenance therapy are specially selected because they don’t cause intoxication in the same way that illicit street drugs would. There are three main drugs used for maintenance therapy: Methadone, Suboxone, and Vivitrol.Methadone Maintenance TherapyWithout a doubt, the most popular medication for use in drug maintenance therapy programs is methadone. As you might not expect, methadone is actually an opioid agonist that affects many of the same areas of the brain as opioids; in fact, it’s sometimes prescribed to patients who suffer from conditions involving chronic pain since it can offer comparable effects as those of most opiate painkillers. However, it doesn’t have the same abuse potential as other opioids while satisfying the cravings that opioid addicts tend to have for drugs. For this reason, methadone tends to have extremely high retention and success rates; according to the World Health Organization, methadone is one of a limited number of drugs that any country will need in order to run smoothly. On the other hand, there are a number of people who don’t support methadone — or any other form of maintenance therapy — because they see it as a person substituting one drug for another and still being physiologically dependent rather than totally free from addiction.Suboxone Maintenance TherapyAfter methadone, Suboxone is definitely the second-most popular medication to be used in drug maintenance therapy, but it’s a very, very different drug than methadone. While methadone is an opioid agonist, Suboxone — or buprenorphine, which is the active ingredient in Suboxone — is a partial opioid agonist that can satisfy cravings much the same was as methadone, but it tends to have something of a blocking effect to other opioids. Being only a partial agonist, there’s very little chance of individuals dying from respiratory depression if they were to attempt to abuse Suboxone, which is another reason why it’s grown in popularity.Can Vivitrol Be Used in Maintenance Therapy?If methadone is on one end of the spectrum and Suboxone is in the middle, Vivitrol is on the other end of the spectrum. More commonly known by the name naltrexone, Vivitrol (a common trade name for naltrexone) doesn’t do much for cravings like methadone and Suboxone; instead, this drug actually blocks the effects of opioids and will induce withdrawal symptoms in an individual who attempts to use opioid drugs while on Vivitrol maintenance. Until recently, the most common use of Vivitrol has been in alcoholism treatment, but since the FDA recently approved the use of Vivitrol for the treatment of opioid addiction, its popularity has been growing rapidly.There’s no form of treatment that’s optimal for everyone, but it’s hard to deny the numbers. Studies show that rates of success are higher for maintenance therapies than for abstinence-based clinical treatment. It’s important that every addict be able to access the form of treatment that is optimal for his or her needs, and that’s where we come in. If you or someone you love would like to discuss drug maintenance therapy or the treatment options that are available, call Sober Services toll-free at (877) 212-5798. Our recovery specialists are available anytime, day or night, so call us now and break free from the chains of addiction.
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Why Resentments in Sobriety Keep You Sick & How to Get Over Them

Why Resentments in Sobriety Keep You Sick & How to Get Over Them
Human beings get angry. It’s part of life just like going to work, falling in love, and everything else. Anger, however, is a very dangerous, poisonous emotion, especially for recovering alcoholics.When we get angry and resent others, we’re drinking poison and expecting the recipient of our ill feelings to die. Resentments in sobriety are a slippery slope. On one hand, everyone has resentments. On the other hand, they keep us from our primary purpose of helping others.For whatever reason, resentment and addiction go hand in hand. In fact, the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous calls resentments “the number one offender.” It’s important for alcoholics and addicts trying to navigate early sobriety to learn how to identify and deal with resentments.What Are Resentments in Sobriety?Resentment is defined as “a feeling of indignant displeasure or persistent ill will at something regarded as a wrong, insult, or injury.”The word itself can be broken down into two parts “re” and “sentiment.” “Re” is defined as again and “sentiment” is a feeling or emotion. Looked at this way, resentments are actually a rehash of earlier emotions.This makes sense. So many people, both in and out of recovery, hold onto resentments in recovery for a very long time. Think about the classic Hatfield vs. McCoy feud. They forgot what the initial resentment was!Resentments in sobriety are dangerous in large part because of the mental obsession they spark and the anger directed at the other person. Alcoholics and addicts enter recovery due to their mental obsession for chemicals. When an addict or alcoholic becomes mentally obsessed with hating another person, they’re essentially transferring their initial obsession with drugs and alcohol to the target of their resentment.If this obsession becomes overwhelming, they often pick up a drink or drug to mitigate the feeling. Getting rid of resentment is as important for sobriety and preventing relapse as anything else!How to Overcome ResentmentsResentments happen because of expectations we have about life. When something doesn’t go our way, we often blame the people, places, and things we deem responsible.It’s important to remember we’re not our higher power and we can’t control everything that happens in our lives.Fortunately, we don’t have to let these resentments run the show! As sober men and women, we have the opportunity to release these resentments. Here are some things you can do to help you get rid of resentment and live your best life.The following are taken from the 4th and 5th step of Alcoholics Anonymous and have proven to be extremely helpful for over 80 years!1) Uncover the WhyWhy are you angry? Why are you hurt? What aspects of your life did this person, place or thing affect?It might be hard to uncover the reason why you’re upset at first, but there’s always a reason! Try to take a few deep breaths and really consider why this resentment is bothering you so much.Remember, the resentment is only bothering you. The other person usually has no idea why you’re angry. Overcoming resentments is about you and your feelings, so really try to consider your true feelings.2) What’s Your Part?Once you discover why you’re upset, you can slowly uncover what your part in the matter is. You might believe that you’re just a victim, that the other person slighted you, but we almost always have a part in the matter.Now, there is the rare situation where you had absolutely nothing to do with the event. However, holding onto a resentment, and keeping yourself sick, is absolutely your part. You MUST figure out your part in the issue.3) Let it GoThis seems challenging, but in the end you have to let go of resentments in recovery. This helps connect and strengthen your connection with your higher power. Letting go of resentments helps you heal since you’re no longer clouded by negativity and anger.4) ForgivenessResentment can be remedied through forgiveness. It’s good for us to forgive and wish the people, places, and things that harmed us the best.Now this doesn’t mean it’s easy! It’s one of the hardest things people in recovery have to do. Still, it’s important to pray that these people receive love and happiness. You might hate the idea of doing this, but it’s good for us, and for them, to forgive and forget.5) Helping OthersThe best way to overcome resentments is to simply be of service to other people.Open the door for an old woman at the grocery store. Talk to a newcomer at a twelve-step meeting. Do your part to get outside of yourself and help someone else (alcoholic, addict or not).Helping others is our primary purpose. When we help others, we don’t obsess about our resentments and are able to do good in the world.Getting HelpLetting go of resentment is hard! Fortunately, the team at Sober Services can help! We can help you or your loved one go to treatment and work on resentments in sobriety and anger with a trained professional. Call us now at (877) 212-5798 or visit our website at Soberservices.org and one of our trained representatives will help you take the next step towards the rest of your life!
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By Aaron's Mom (NYC unspoken Poet) I start my message to you with - I LOVE YOU.  When my son Aaron was alive, he always asked me, "Mom, why is t...
  Q) Is Codeine An Opiate? Is Codeine an opiate? Many people think Codeine is a common painkiller, whilst true as it is one of the more social...
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